Sunday Reflections

I’ve loved books since I was young. The AR program really caught on while I was in elementary school, and my reading level made me privy to the coveted back room of the school library. Inside, I pored over a solitary cart of high school level books. I was amazed at the complexity of them compared to the swill that passed for juvenile reading material. I was instantly hooked. Books by Agatha Christie, Jules Verne, and Daniel Defoe opened up the floodgates of my imagination. I don’t know that I’ll ever be as captivated by anything for the rest of my life as much as I was with Robinson Crusoe and They Came to Baghdad.

Although I consider myself fairly well-read for my age (as well as being a product of the horrendous public school system), I’ve barely begun to scratch the surface of the world’s great literature. Standard literary fare in my high school consisted of drug store Westerns and and a scant few pieces of literature that are actually worthwhile – Othello, Beowulf, and possibly a few others. So I’ve largely been left to my own devices when it comes to exploring literature. I still read a fair amount of new books, but I’m really concentrating on the classics. I bought Great American Short Stories, one of Barnes & Noble’s classics series, and I’ve loved sampling what American literature has to offer. So far, Hawthorne and O. Henry have been my favorites, and I rushed out to pick up more of their work. There’s nothing better than delving into an author’s work who you’ve never before read. My to-read list keeps getting longer and longer, as my bookcase is getting more and more crowded. It’s awesome.

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~ by miyagisan on June 1, 2008.

3 Responses to “Sunday Reflections”

  1. I think it is awesome you are reading classic literature most people aren’t interested in the oldies but goodies. Unfortunately, as a recent graduate with a degree in literature I’m burnt out on the classics and am now on a Dean Koontz binge to try and relieve my fried brain! 🙂

  2. The classics make an interesting read, but their words are hard to digest.

  3. I think it is awesome you are reading classic literature most people aren’t interested in the oldies but goodies. Unfortunately, as a recent graduate with a degree in literature I’m burnt out on the classics and am now on a Dean Koontz binge to try and relieve my fried brain! 🙂

    Haha, I’ll probably be in the same situation a few years from now once I’ve graduated.

    The classics make an interesting read, but their words are hard to digest.

    No doubt that many classics are a departure from what we’re accustomed to, but that’s part of the fun for me! However, I do find some authors unnecessarily confusing, like Henry James.

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